Although this week marks the eighth annual observation of Fair Use Week, I remain unconvinced that the fair use doctrine is any better understood today than it was before this ritual began. I see fair use errors all the time—e.g. in chat threads where creators are trying to do the right thing—and I maintain that it is often the fair ...

I have covered the development of the CASE Act in depth. But because the usual gang of anti-copyright zealots began screaming on social media at the news that the small-claim copyright provision was attached to the omnibus spending bill that passed last night, I offer some responses to those allegations about CASE that are factually untrue as well as the predictions ...

The wicked deeds of the infamous copyright troll have been cited among the excuses to reject many proposed improvements for copyright enforcement in the digital age. For anyone unfamiliar with the term, copyright trolls (and their cousins the patent trolls), are the ambulance-chasers of IP law. They file often dubious copyright claims with the sole purpose of frightening settlements out ...

Anyone who is consistently engaged on copyright issues is used to hearing the rhetoric from the major critics, who say things like We support creators while they advocate policies that will further erode authorial rights.  Whether these parties engage in this kind of chicanery in order to sacrifice artists at the altar of Big Tech, or they do it just because they are ...

After the CASE Act passed the House (410-6) on October 22 and moved onto the Senate, the various groups opposed to this copyright small-claim bill turned up the volume on the eerie headline that says Share a Meme.  Lose $30,000!  I and others responded that this allegation is simply not grounded in reality, and to this, Meredith Rose of PublicKnowledge replied with the ...

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)