In the continuing saga of state actors getting away with copyright infringement, let’s look at the story of author/publisher Michael Bynum and his book about the legendary “12th Man” of the Texas A&M University (TAMU) football team. The tale, which has been passed down through generations of Aggies and other football fans, describes the “Dixie Classic” of 1922, when the ...

And it’s a shame that justice will not be the basis on which it is corrected. If it ever is. Recently, the U.S. Copyright Office published its report on copyright infringement by states and state actors in response to the present circumstance whereby states are immunized against litigation for unlicensed use of protected works. As the Supreme Court held in ...

You wouldn’t think that a state entity would have the right to seize your intellectual property any more than it would have the right to seize other forms of property without due process. But it can. In this podcast, I talk with filmmaker Rick Allen and copyright expert and advocate Kevin Madigan about the challenge that state sovereign immunity poses ...

In my first two Revisited posts summarizing the legislative and judicial history leading up to the Supreme Court decision in Allen v. Cooper, I dove into some fairly deep waters. But now, let’s return to the practical matter at hand for contemporary authors of creative works. In short, if a state entity infringes your copyrights, you’re basically hosed. Meanwhile, unjust ...

(NOTE: This post relies on information presented in Part I.) In my first post in this series, I tried to summarize (albeit in nearly 3,000 words) the reasons why the states, and arms of the states, may freely infringe intellectual property without fear of being sued for monetary damages. I referred to the Eleventh Amendment as a pain in the ...

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